Category Archives: Lolita Knowledge
Fashion Lolita Dresses For Summer
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The Crinoline or Hoop Skirt
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The 1800s crinoline, also called a hoop skirt or extension skirt, was  inspired by the open cage or frame style of the 16th and 17th century farthingale and the 18th century pannier. The Victorian crinoline developed various appearances over it’s fashion lifetime as a result of new designs and methods of manufacture.

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The word crinoline originally referred to a stiff fabric with a weft of horse hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread (the Latin crinis meaning hair and linum meaning flax). This fabric made its first appearance in fashion in the 1830s when it was used in women’s petticoats to support and shape the growing length and diameter of the early Victorian dress. Often a petticoat of this stiffened fabric was worn with up to six starched petticoats in an attempt to achieve the big skirt effect; these tangling petticoats were heavy, bulky and generally uncomfortable.

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The heavy folds of velvet fabric of this Victorian ball gown are supported by a hoop skirt. At its peak in size, the crinoline reached a diameter of up to 180 centimeters, almost six feet.

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Next rings of stiffened cord encircling the petticoat were tried. These corded skirts were too heavy, thus unable to support their own weight.  During the 1850s the extension skirt was developed with rigidity added to the skirt in the form of cane and whalebone hoops.  These hoops created the desired width but were too easily broken.  Subsequently thin strips of brass replaced the cane but the brass did not possess sufficient elasticity to enable the skirt to resume its rounded form after being submitted to considerable pressure.   Ultimately hoops of flattened steel wire were employed to stiffen the “extension skirts” of the late 1850s and were found to be lighter than hoop skirtcane or brass hoops.

 

 

 

 

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Furthermore, the flattened steel wire was so elastic and strong that it could be severely bent (going through doorways or sitting), and yet the skirt would spring back to its original shape. The cage crinoline was adopted with enthusiasm; it was light and only required one or two petticoats worn over the top to prevent the steel bands from appearing as ridges in the skirt. At its peak in size, the crinoline reached a diameter of up to 180 centimeters, almost six feet.  The wearing of the crinoline was a fashion that was adopted by all classes, and worn by both women and young girls.

 

 

 

MID-19th CENTURY CRINOLINE OR HOOP SKIRT

MID-19th CENTURY CRINOLINE OR HOOP SKIRT

MID-19th CENTURY CAGE CRINOLINE OR HOOP SKIRT

MID-19th CENTURY CAGE CRINOLINE OR HOOP SKIRT

 

The best steel for making the wire for the crinoline cage came from England, in the form of coiled rods, of about ¾ of an inch in thickness. The first operation to which it was submitted, was heating it to about a bright red heat in a furnace hoop skirtadapted for the

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purpose, by which it was softened. It was next scoured with acid, to remove all oxide from its surface, after which it was coated with rye flour and dried in a special apparatus. Next the steel rod was reduced in diameter, while at the same time greatly extending its length until it became a No. 19 wire in size, and had been extended in length from a few yards to no less than two thousand yards.  After having been reduced to the requisite size it was flattened by drawing it from one reel and winding it upon another, then hardened and tempered. Lastly yarn was braided around the wire, and then sent to the warehouse to be placed in skirts. No less than 60,000 yards of flattened steel wire were made and covered daily in this operation. These covered wire hoops were suspended by tapes in the form of a skirt, descending in increasing diameters from a band worn around the woman’s waist.

 

 

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DOUGLAS & SHERWOOD’S PATENT ADJUSTABLE BUSTLE AND SKIRT – 1858

They are made of fine cloth. The Bustle is of fine whalebone, extending part of the way round the skirt; at their ends are eyelets, through which a corset lace is passed.

GODEY’S LADY’S BOOK, 1858

In 1858, Douglas & Sherwood referred to themselves as a “manufactory of hooped skirts” with almost four hundred young women employed in their factory. They advertised their new style, the “Adjustable Bustle and Skirt” in the February 1858 issue of Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine; the bustle was made with “round whalebone.”  Later that year, Douglas & Sherwood introduced their “Balmoral Skirt” which combined both the hoop and a woolen, red and black graduated stripe skirt.

MID-19th CENTURY CRINOLINE OR HOOP SKIRT

MID-19th CENTURY CRINOLINE OR HOOP SKIRT

DOUGLAS & SHERWOOD'S NEW EXPANSION  SKIRT (HOOP SKIRT)- 1858

DOUGLAS & SHERWOOD’S NEW EXPANSION SKIRT (HOOP SKIRT)- 1858

DOUGLAS & SHERWOOD'S PATENT BALMORAL HOOP SKIRT - 1858

DOUGLAS & SHERWOOD’S PATENT BALMORAL HOOP SKIRT – 1858

16The “Highland” costume was featured in Peterson’s Magazine in 1861. With this dress, a Balmoral hoop skirt was indispensable. Some ladies made the petticoat of plain gray flannel, and ornamented it with rows of red cloth or flannel.

In 1859, Osborn & Vincent of New York listed itself as the owners of the extension skirt patent. Their most popular skirts in 1859 were the “Imperial Skirt” and their new “Champion Belle.” The latter extension skirt was described as “exceedingly light and graceful,” as well as “extremely flexible and convenient in carriages, cars, and stages.”

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Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine in 1859 provided a picture of “The Woven Extension Skirt” saying that it was impossible to rip or tear the tapes “as they were wove in the springs.”  Also in 1859, J. Holmes & Co. stated that in spite of its lightness and compactness, an extension skirt’s primary concern was “easy adjustability into smaller space for the parlor or expansion into ample dimension for the promenade.” J. Holmes & Co. introduced their new patent extension skirt with a system of clasps and slides; this skirt had a watch spring bustle wrought into the skirt, forming a uniform bishop shape throwing the fullness at the back, and hanging gracefully straight in the front.

 

 

 

19 The crinoline reached its maximum dimensions by 1860 but then gradually began to change. An 1860 ladies’ magazine referred to the crinoline as “bird cagey contrivances” and stated,  “The pyramidal crinoline, diminished in size but in demi-train, is in favor.”  In 1862, the English Woman’s Domestic Magazine recommended the W.S. Thomson crinoline to “those ladies who prefer the open petticoats, or cages.” Over 2,000 workers were employed in Thomson’s London location, producing 4,000 crinoline cages a day. According to the magazine, Thomson’s crinolines possessed two advantages over other manufactured skirts: “the binding on which the steels are threaded cannot break in consequence of it being so broad; and the eyelet-holes do not wear away the tape so quickly as do the metal claws usually used to secure the steels in their places.”  Furthermore, the back of the jupon of the Thomson crinoline was threaded in the shape of a gore, to suit the fashionable train skirts. The upper half of the back part of the crinoline was made with a small inside one which passed half way round; but being smaller than the outside, threw the skirt off behind in a demi-train.

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By them middle of the 1860s, the dome-like shape of a women’s skirt decreased with the volume disappearing in the front and gathering at the back.  In 1865, A.T. Stewart advertised a “Bon-Ton Skirt,” a wire flexible spring skirt that kept the front of the skirt “fitting closely to the form.”  By 1867, Godey’s Lady’s Book and Magazine decided that “ladies enjoyed more advantages respecting dress – close and flowing sleeves, short and long skirts, tight-fitting, case like dresses, others with plaits at the back . . . waists fitting corset-like over the hips, hoops clinging to the figure, and the positive extreme bustles!”  The pannier fullness at the back was made to curve gracefully with the front of the skirt perfectly straight, fitting smoothly over the figure.

 

Victorian Ball Dress – 1844-48
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Ball Dresses – 1844

Evening gowns of the mid-1840s were worn off the shoulder and featured short tight sleeves with either puff decorations or lace trimming. Bodices presented a rigidly boned elongated shape with a waist that formed a perfect point in the front.

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Victorian Ball Dress 1844-48

Showcased is a marvelous young lady’s French silk ball dress. The evening gown features short tight sleeves ornamented with puffs, lace and silk ribbon — characteristic of the mid-1840s. The exquisite fabric is a rose pink moiré silk patterned with blossoms and leaves. The elongated bodice is rigidly boned with a glazed cotton lining and features lacing holes to the back. The ball dress is trimmed with handmade black Valenciennes lace and pink striped silk ribbon and bows. The voluminous full skirt measures 164 inches and is slightly trained.

 

How To Have A Victorian Ball
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It was in the ballroom that Victorian society was on its best behavior. Everything there was regulated according to the strictest code of good-breeding, and as any departure from this code became a grave offense, it was indispensable that the etiquette of the Victorian ballroom was thoroughly mastered. The following hints on 19th century Victorian ballroom dancing concentrate on the period from the 1840s to the mid-1860s.

 

 

 

It was in the ballroom that Victorian society was on its best behavior. Everything there was regulated according to the strictest code of good-breeding, and as any departure from this code became a grave offense, it was indispensable that the etiquette of the Victorian ballroom was thoroughly mastered. The following hints on 19th century Victorian ballroom dancing concentrate on the period from the 1840s to the mid-1860s.

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PREPARATIONS: There were various ways of organizing a Victorian ball — the most common one was for several people, interested in dancing, to meet together and choose a Committee of Arrangements or Managers, as they were sometimes called. It was their duty to procure a hall, engage a quadrille band, make arrangements for the supper, and issue invitations to those they wanted to attend the dance.

3It was the special duty of one or more of the committee to attend to each of the above duties for the Victorian dance. The number of the committee varied from five to twenty, according to the amount of services to be performed. If the invitations for the dance were to be sent to adjoining towns, at least one of the committee was chosen from each town, or in case there were several villages in the town, one from each village. On the evening of the Victorian ball, two or more of the committee would be chosen as ballroom dancing floor managers, to see that the sets were full, and that all persons wishing for dancing partners were supplied; and also to direct the music, as well as to decide any questions that may arise in the Victorian ballroom.

 

 

 

4Victorian military and fire engine companies, clubs and associations often gave a single dance or perhaps a series of parties—the same committee officiating during the different evenings. Furthermore, it was the custom for teachers of ballroom dancing, in connection with their schools, to open their rooms to the public after nine o’clock in the evening.  Any proper person could, for a small sum of usually fifty cents, join in the amusements. These Victorian parties usually ended at about twelve o’clock, while Victorian dances generally continued some hours later.

Sometimes Victorian balls were organized by some speculator, who generally managed the whole matter himself. Victorian balls of this class were not always select, as the invitations were given to the public in general, and persons deemed “improper” too frequently gained admission. Refreshments would be provided for the guests during the evening; and, as nothing would be passed around the Victorian ballroom, a refreshment room was absolutely necessary. Provided in the refreshment room was tea and coffee, ices, biscuits, cakes, cracker-bonbons, cold tongues, and sandwiches.  If a regular supper was served it would be laid in a separate room. To order it in from a confectioner or caterer was the simplest plan, but it often proved somewhat expensive. If provided at home, it was done on a liberal, but not vulgarly profuse, scale. Substantial fare, such as fowls, ham, tongue, etc., was absolutely necessary. Jellies, blanc-mange, trifle, tipsy cake, etc., would be added at discretion. Nothing upon the table would require carving; the fowls would be cut up beforehand, and held together by ribbons. Whatever could be iced would be served in that way.

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VICTORIAN DRESS FOR LADIES

A Victorian lady, in dressing for a ball, first needed to consider the delicate question of age; and next, that of her position, whether married or single. She would then reflect on the simplicity of her attire, the elegance of the design of her gown, and then the propriety of colors. As everything about a Victorian ballroom would be light, gay, and the reverse of depressing, it was permitted for elderly ladies who did not dance to assume a lighter style of dress than would be proper at the dinner table, concert, or opera.

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The gown of the married and unmarried lady, however youthful the former, would be distinctly marked. Silk dresses were, as a rule, objectionable for those who danced; but the married lady could appear in a moiré of a light tint, or even in a white silk, if properly trimmed with tulle and flowers. Flowers or small feathers were stylish for the head; jewelry would be very sparingly displayed, a single bracelet was quite sufficient for those who danced.

Young unmarried ladies would wear Victorian gowns of light materials — the lighter the better. Tarlatane, gauze, tulle, areophane, net, the finest muslin, lace, and all similar fabrics, were available; such Victorian dresses would be worn over a silk slip.

 

 

Victorian ladies in deep mourning would not dance, even if they permitted themselves to attend a Victorian ball.  For those in mourning, black and scarlet or violet was the proper attire. When the mourning permitted dancing, white with mauve, violet or black trimmings and flounces was proper. A black satin dress looked best when covered with net, tarlatan, or crape—the latter only to be worn in mourning.

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In the selection of colors a lady would consider her figure and her complexion. If slender and sylph-like, white or very light colors were generally suitable; but if inclined to be plump, these colors would be avoided, as they had the reputation of apparently adding to the hulk of the wearer. Moreover, the harmony of Victorian dress involved the idea of contrast and would be chosen with reference to the wearer; thus, a blonde appeared to most advantage in delicate hues, such as pink, salmon, light blue, maize, apple green, white, and so forth. The brunette would, on the contrary, select rich and brilliant colors.

The head-dress for the evening would be in unison with the Victorian gown, though ladies who had a profusion of beautiful hair required little or no artificial ornament; a simple flower was all that was necessary. To those who were less gifted in this respect, wreaths were generally thought becoming. A tall lady would avoid wearing anything across the head, as that added to her apparent height. A “chaplet” or a “drooping wreath” would, therefore, be preferable.

 

 

 

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All the accessories for the evening — gloves, shoes, flowers, fans, and the opera cloak—would be fresh and new. Inattention in this matter spoiled the effect of the most impressive gown. White gloves were appropriate for the Victorian ballroom: in mourning they were sewn with black. The gloves would be faultless as to fit, and never be removed from the hands in the ballroom. It was proper for those who dance to be provided with a second pair to replace the others when soiled or in case they split, or if the buttons came off. White satin shoes were worn with light colored dresses; and black or bronze with dark dresses. It was also stylish for boots to be worn in the ballroom; these were of kid, satin, or silk, either white or matching the dress in color.

 

 

VICTORIAN DRESS FOR GENTLEMEN

The attire in which a Victorian gentleman could present himself in a ballroom was strictly defined. He would wear a black superfine dress-coat, pair of well-fitting pants of the same

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color, and a black Ballroom Dancingor white vest. The Victorian ball-suit would be of the very best cloth, new and glossy and of the latest style as to the cut. The waistcoat would be low, so as to disclose an ample shirt-front, fine and delicately plaited; it was not embroidered, but small gold studs were used for decoration. He would also have a black or white cravat, tie or stock—the necktie would be of a washing texture, not silk, and not set off with embroidery. In addition, included were a pair of patent leather boots with low heels; white kid gloves–not straw-color or lavender; and a white linen cambric handkerchief. The hair would be well dressed, without too many curls; the whole effect would be in perfect keeping with the general appearance. Excess of jewelry would not be worn: simple studs, gold solitaire sleeve-links, and a watch chain—massive with charms and appendages. Perfumes would be avoided as effeminate; if used at all, only for the handkerchief, they would be of the very best scent so as not to offend.

10NIGHT OF THE VICTORIAN BALL

In calling for the lady invited, the Victorian gentleman would be punctual at the hour appointed. If he ordered a carriage, he handed her in first, and sat opposite to her unless she requested him to change his position. They were not obliged to go exactly at the appointed hour; it was even fashionable to go an hour later. Victorian married ladies were accompanied by their husbands; unmarried ones by their mother or by a chaperon.

In leaving the carriage, the Victorian gentleman preceded the lady and assisted her in descending, he would then conduct her to the ladies’ dressing room, leaving her in the charge of the maid, while he went to the gentlemen’s apartments to divest himself of overcoat, hat, and boots.

The lady in the meantime, after arranging her Victorian dress, retired to the ladies’ sitting-room or awaited the gentleman’s arrival at the door of the dressing-room. A cloak-room for the ladies was usually provided, with one or two maids to receive the shawls or cloaks. The maids would also render any assistance in the way of arranging hair or dress, repairing a torn dress, or any necessity of that kind.  In this room there would be several mirrors, with a supply of hair-pins, needles and thread, pins, and similar trifles.

A hat room for Victorian gentlemen was also available with tickets, numbered in duplicate for the articles belonging to the ladies and gentlemen that were left in the charge of the attendants. With two tickets of each number, one of these was pinned on the coat or cloak as it was handed in, and the other given to the owner. By this means the property of each guest was identified, and confusion at the time of departure was prevented.

 

IN THE VICTORIAN BALLROOM

The floor-managers gave the order to the orchestra to commence, and also took the lead in entering the Victorian ballroom. The Victorian gentleman either joined in the promenade, or conducted his lady to a seat.  Upon entering the ballroom, the gentleman’s first duty was to 11procure a program for his Ballroom Dancingpartner, and to introduce his friends, who placed their names on her card for the dances engaged. The sound of a trumpet was generally the signal for the assembly to take their positions on the floor for dancing. A gentleman would, in all cases, dance the first set with the lady in company with him, after which he could exchange partners with a friend; or dance again with her, as circumstances or inclination would dictate.

A Victorian lady could not refuse the invitation of a gentleman to dance, unless she had already accepted that of another, for she would be guilty of an incivility. Ladies who danced often, would be very careful not to boast of the great number of dances for which they were engaged in advance before those who danced but little or not at all. They would also, without being seen, recommend these less fortunate ladies to gentlemen of their acquaintance.  At a private ball or party, a lady would show reserve, and not show more preference for one gentleman than another; moreover, she would dance with all who asked properly.

The master of the house would see that all the ladies danced; he would take notice particularly of those who appeared to be wall-flowers, and would see that they were invited to dance.  But he would do this wholly unperceived, in order not Ballroom Dancingto wound the self-esteem of

11the unfortunate ladies. Gentlemen, whom the master of the house requested to dance with these ladies, would be ready to accede to his wish, and even appear pleased at dancing with the lady recommended. Frequently, some young Victorian gentlemen breached the rules of proper etiquette; they were so very particular that they considered it a remarkable inconvenience to dance with a lady unless she happened to be very pretty and interesting. Those young men rarely brought ladies with them, and were constantly bothering their friends and the floor managers to be introduced to the best dancers and the prettiest young ladies that they saw in the room. If there were not as many gentlemen as ladies present; two ladies were permitted to dance together in order to fill up a set, or two gentlemen could dance if there were a shortage of ladies. But it was not proper for ladies to refuse to dance with gentlemen, and afterwards dance together, or for gentlemen to do the same after having refused to be introduced to ladies. Engaged persons would not dance together too often; it was in bad taste; furthermore, it was considered a violation of etiquette for man and wife to dance together.

When introduced to a lady, a Victorian gentleman was particular about how he asked her to dance, and the manner in which he bowed to her, and also of requesting to see her card; ladies were susceptible of first impressions, and it depended a good deal upon the manner in which the gentleman first presented himself.  In requesting a lady to dance, he stood at a proper distance, bent the body gracefully, accompanied by a slight motion of the right hand in front, he looked at her amicably, and respectfully said, “Will you do me the honor to dance with me;” or “Shall I have the pleasure of dancing with you;” or “Will you be pleased, or will you favor me with your hand for this or the next dance.” He remained in the position he had assumed until the lady signified her intention, by saying, “With pleasure sir,” or “I regret I am engaged sir.” The gentleman would then place his name on her card, and after having made the necessary arrangements, he would politely bow and withdraw.

When a Victorian gentleman danced with a lady to whom he was a stranger, he was cautious in his conversation.  When the music ended, he bowed to his partner, presented his right arm, and led her to her seat; if the seat was occupied, he would politely ask her to what part of the hall she would like to be conducted; he would also bow as she took her seat.  The gentleman was not at liberty to sit by her side, unless he was on terms of intimacy.  Would he wish to dance with a lady with whom he was not acquainted, he applied first to his friends, who would try to procure for him the desired introduction.  If not, the Victorian gentleman would make application to one of the floor managers, who would introduce him if he was acquainted with the lady; otherwise the floor manager would not present him without first demanding the consent of the lady. The etiquette of the ballroom differed slightly in the country.  In country ballrooms, generally a gentleman would ask any lady to dance with him and, after an introduction, could enter into conversation or promenade with her through the room without being considered guilty of breeching proper etiquette.

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Victorian gentlemen would attempt to entertain the ladies who danced with them with a little conversation, hopefully more novel than the weather and the heat of the room; and in round dances they would be particularly careful to guard them from collisions, and to see that their dresses were not torn. A gentleman would not engage a lady for more than four dances during the evening, as it could deprive her of the pleasure of dancing with those of her friends who may arrive at a later hour; besides much familiarity was out of place in a ballroom. At the end of the dance, the gentleman conducted the lady to her place, bowed and thanked her for the honor which she had presented. She also bowed in silence, smiling with a gracious air.

Nevertheless, no Victorian gentleman could take advantage of a ballroom introduction because it was given with a view to one dance only, and would certainly not warrant a gentleman in going any further than asking a lady to dance the second time. Out of the ballroom such an introduction had no meaning whatsoever.  If those who had danced together met the next day in the street, the gentleman would not venture to bow, unless the lady chose to recognize him—if he did bow, he would not expect any acknowledgment of his greeting nor take offense if it was withheld.

In a private Victorian ball or party, it was proper for a lady to show reserve, and not manifest more preference for one gentleman than another— she would dance with all who asked properly. Ladies would avoid talking too much during the dance; it was also in bad taste to whisper continually in the ear of her partner. Ladies would avoid affectation, frowning, quizzing, or the slightest indication of ill-temper.  No loud laughter, loud talking, or staring would be seen in a lady’s behavior.  It was recommended that every lady stop dancing the moment she felt fatigued, or had any difficulty in breathing.  Married or young ladies could not leave a ballroom, or any other party, alone. The former would be accompanied by one or two other married ladies, and the latter by their mother, or by a lady to represent her.

 

2015 New Arrival Japanese Kimono For Women
2015 Cheap Ladies Cosplay Lolita Kimono

What is the Kimono ?

The kimono is a Japanese traditional garment, All of kimonos has wide sleeve and wrapped around the body , it always with the left side over the right and secured by a sash called an obi. which is tied at the back.

With the popularity of Japanese anime and manga, the Japanese clothing widely been recognized .Many roles played and cosplay by people. Now, the Kimono are most often use on cosplay party and special occasions.

So salelolita.com recommended some Japanese Kimono for your cosplay show and other activities.

 

2015 New Anime Vocaloid Cosplay Kimono For Women

2015 New Anime Vocaloid Cosplay Kimono For Women

 

2015 Cheap Ladies Cosplay Lolita Kimono

2015 Cheap Ladies Cosplay Lolita Kimono

 

2015 New Discount Purple Print Lolita Kimono Women Cosplay Dress

2015 New Discount Purple Print Lolita Kimono Women Cosplay Dress

 

2015 High Quality Black And White Lace Lolita Kimono Ladies Maid Cosplay Dress

2015 High Quality Black And White Lace Lolita Kimono Ladies Maid Cosplay Dress

 

2015 New Elegant Pink Lolita Kimono Japanese Cosplay Costume

2015 New Elegant Pink Lolita Kimono Japanese Cosplay Costume

 

2015 Cheap Anime Inuyasha Cosplay Costume Kikyou Cosplay Kimono

2015 Cheap Anime Inuyasha Cosplay Costume Kikyou Cosplay Kimono

 

 

2015 High Quality Black And White Lace Lolita Kimono Ladies Maid Cosplay Dress

Development of Victorian Dress,Victorian Era Costumes
Development Of Victorian Era Dress

Do you know victorian fashion ? Do you know victorian costumes how to development?

In 1830s to 1900s, Victorian costumes throughout the Victorian era. The period saw many changes in fashion .

In the 1840s and 1850s, women’s gowns had wide puffed sleeves. Dresses were simple and pale, and incorporated realistic flower trimming. Petticoats, corsets, and chemises were worn under gowns. By the 1850s the number of petticoats was reduced to be superseded by the crinoline, and the size of skirts expanded. Day dresses had a solid bodice and evening gowns had a very low neckline and were worn off the shoulder with shawls.

In the 1860s, the skirts became flatter at the front and projected out more behind the woman. Day dresses had wide pagoda sleeves and high necklines with lace or tatted collars. Evening dresses had low necklines and short sleeves, and were worn with short gloves, fingerless lace or crocheted mitts.

In the 1870s, un-corseted tea gowns were introduced for informal entertaining at home and steadily grew in popularity. Bustles were used to replace the crinoline to hold the skirts up behind the woman, even for “seaside dresses”. The fad of hoop skirts had faded and women strived for a slimmer style. The dresses were extremely tight around the corseted torso and the waist and upper legs; Punch ran many cartoons showing women who could neither sit nor climb stairs in their tight dresses.[1] The crinoline was replaced by the bustle in the rear. Small hats were perched towards the front of the head, over the forehead. To complement the small hat, women wore their hair in elaborate curls. Some women wore hairpieces called “scalpettes” and “frizzettes” to add to the volume of their hair.[1]

In the 1880s, riding habits had a matching jacket and skirt (without a bustle), a high-collared shirt or chemisette, and a top hat with a veil. Hunting costumes had draped ankle-length skirts worn with boots or gaiters. Clothing worn when out walking had a long jacket and skirt, worn with the bustle, and a small hat or bonnet. Travelers wore long coats like dusters.

In the 1890s, Women’s wear in the last decade of the Victorian era was characterised by high collars, held in place by collar stays, and stiff steel boning in long line bodices. By this time, there were neither crinolines nor bustles. Women opted for the tiny wasp waist instead.

In the past few years, Salelolita was devoted to design Victorian Dresses. We will provide quality  products to costumer. Enjoy your shopping  !

How to definition bustle dress?
victorian bustle dress

A bustle is a type of framework used to expand the fullness or support the drapery of the back of a woman’s dress, occurring predominantly in the mid-to-late 19th century. Bustles were worn under the skirt in the back, just below the waist, to keep the skirt from dragging. Heavy fabric tended to pull the back of a skirt down and flatten it. Thus, a woman’s petticoated or crinolined skirt would lose its shape during everyday wear (from merely sitting down or moving about). The word “bustle” has become synonymous with the fashion to which the bustle was integral.

The bustle was a typically Victorian fashion. Although most bustle gowns covered nearly all of a woman, the shape created by the combination of a bustle and corset (accentuating the rump, waist, and bosom) resulted in highly idealized representations of female sexual identity, at once exaggerated and concealed by the structures of adornment. A notable comparison is with the exaggerated images of the South African woman known as “Hottentot Venus” exhibited throughout Europe in the first part of the 19th century.

Bustles and bustle gowns are rarely worn in contemporary society. Notable exceptions occur in the realm of haute couture, bridal fashion and Lolita Fashion. A dress in the bustle style may be worn as a costume. For example, in 1993 Eiko Ishioka won an Academy Award for her costume designs from Bram Stoker’s Dracula. The film features several extravagant bustle gowns created for female leads Winona Ryder and Sadie Frost.

where to buy tailored dresses?
custom dress

You still can not find the right size and melancholy yet ?

Do not worry, salelolita.com can be professional tailored clothes for you .You only need to provide us with pictures of clothes and the customize size .salelolita is the leading supplier of online shopping for victorian dresses,lolita clothing,cosplay costumes,sexy lingeries,mascot costumes,catsuits zentai,accessories,shoes and so on .

Welcome friends from all over the world to customize your favorite dresses. We are the direct manufacturer, Whether you are a single-piece production or mass customization, our factory will do our best to do .please do not hesitate to contact us right away . Please click the below link:

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custom dress

custom dress by your self

 

The Mashup Trends of Lolita in 2014
lolita

Fashion trend is really hard for us to predict. But with the fashion type in mind, we really can figure out what we want. For Lolita dress, we are really in love with its elegant look. Maybe some innovation like mashup of Lolita will be the new trends these years.

When did the mashup start? Probably it started on February 24, 2004 when DJ Dangermouse mixed the Beatles’ The White Album with Jay-Z’s The Black Album. The result, The Grey Album, was downloaded a million times in one day: Mash-Up Culture was born. We simply love it when two (or more) different worlds get together in a creative, innovative smooth way. Be it in music. Be it in playful mash-up movies: Rocky Bilboa (Sylvester Stalone in Rocky 4) mashes op with Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep in the Devil Wears Prada, see on top of this page). Be it in the virtual social networks we love and are still separated from each other. Be it with the Lolita dress without mentioned about the traditional type but the mash up.

The Lolita look has been a notable counterculture in Japan with subtypes ranging from gothic Lolita (a mostly black wardrobe, dark wardrobe, red lips) to sweet Lolita (pastel dresses, ruffles and bows galore, childlike makeup) for over 10 years. In Japan, this culture is more influenced by Lolita-looking anime characters than the actual Lolita novel.

Lolita has long been a fashion type that the public are look for. Rococo type and gothic type are the most popular style. As the anime of Japan swept the world, the maidservant style has been infatuated with by the girls. Boys are also fun of the Lolita cosplay. Some of the very good looking man also is part of the show.

Anime characters are inspired off of Lolita fashion and its influences, the Victorian and Rocco Eras. Lolita started in the 70′s and is said to be not only influenced by J.Rock/Visual Kei bands of the time, but also brands and designers of that time as well, i.e. Pink House, who’s designs are not particularly Lolita

But the Lolita cosplay is not so popular at present. How could we show up our style and how the mash-up could work well? Now look at the pictures as follows:

This is a mash-up of the maiden outfit and Lolita boot. Simple and clear type is definitely the public cup of tea.

Lolita Dresses are from: www.salelolita.com

 

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